Recent Posts

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 10
1
Blogs of Interest and Note / Re: Reggle's Blog-DoS attack types.
« Last post by ristau5741 on Today at 01:42:11 PM »
Looks like Reggle updated his Wordpress code, lol.

probably to mitigate Wordpress DOS attacks.  >:D
2
Blogs of Interest and Note / Re: Reggle's Blog-DoS attack types.
« Last post by deanwebb on Today at 09:11:48 AM »
Looks like Reggle updated his Wordpress code, lol.
3
Linux iptables part II: IPv6 and NAT

After the basics in part I, on to IPv6 and NAT. The title is misleading here: iptables exists for IPv6 and iptables can do NAT, but iptables cannot do NAT for IPv6 connections. As for IPv6, this part is very simple: just add a ‘6’ between ‘ip’ and ‘tables’… … and it will work for […]
Source: Linux iptables part II: IPv6 and NAT

From https://reggle.wordpress.com/
4
Linux iptables part I: basic rules

[html]Most modern Linux distributions come with a firewall package already active. Since it’s often set in an ‘allow-all’ mode, people are often unaware of it. Meet iptables, a basic yet powerful stateful firewall. You can see a default ‘allow-all’ policy above.
5
Route leaking between VRFs using BGP.

This article further continues on earlier experiments. While using internal tunnels gave a logically ‘simple’ point-to-point network seen from a layer 3 point of view, it came with the drawback of complex header calculations, resulting in CPU hogging on devices capable of hardware switching. Using some route-maps to choose VRFs for flows proved interesting, but […]
Source: Route leaking between VRFs using BGP.

From https://reggle.wordpress.com/
6
Home lab: My GRE tunnel endeavors.

This article is not really written with knowledge usable for a production network in mind. It’s more of an “I have not failed. I’ve just found 10,000 ways that won’t work.” kind of article. I’m currently in a mailing group with fellow network engineers who are setting up GRE tunnels to each others home networks […]
Source: Home lab: My GRE tunnel endeavors.

From https://reggle.wordpress.com/
7
Efficient connection logging on a switch.

I know, it’s been quiet on this blog for the past months. But here we are again, starting off with a simple post. Maybe not much real world practical use, but fun to know. Dealing with ACLs requires more protocol knowledge compared to dealing with a stateful firewall. A stateful firewall takes care of return […]
Source: Efficient connection logging on a switch.

From https://reggle.wordpress.com/
8
Blogs of Interest and Note / Reggle's Blog-I passed the ARCH exam!
« Last post by Reggle on Today at 06:01:25 AM »
I passed the ARCH exam!

It’s been a while since I’ve posted something here. Multiple reasons of course, but lately I just had to focus on learning so much I didn’t take the time for it anymore. Why? Well since I got my CCNP almost three years ago, it had to be recertified. Together with my CCDA that presented the […]
Source: I passed the ARCH exam!

From https://reggle.wordpress.com/
9
Tracing unexpected BPDU packets in a LAN.

Disclaimer: the logs are taken from a production network but the values (VLAN ID, names) are randomized. Recently, I encountered an issue on a Campus LAN while performing routine checks: spanning tree seemed to undergo regular changes. The LAN in question uses five VLANs and RPVST+, a Cisco-only LAN. At first sight there was no […]
Source: Tracing unexpected BPDU packets in a LAN.

From https://reggle.wordpress.com/
10
VLANs, 3560 and a simple home router.

Just a simple article about something I recently did in my home network. I wanted to prepare the network for a Squid proxy, and design it in such a way that the client devices did not require proxy settings. Having trouble placing it inline, I decided I could use WCCP. However, that requires separate VLANs. […]
Source: VLANs, 3560 and a simple home router.

From https://reggle.wordpress.com/
Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 10