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Messages - deanwebb

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1
Home and Small Office Networking / Re: I've been in flux
« on: September 21, 2022, 09:07:35 AM »
Nice rig, there. What's the graphics on it like?

2
Routing and Switching / Re: Errors on T1 D-Channel
« on: September 21, 2022, 09:06:36 AM »
The PBX folks need to come clean and you are right to press for the exact error messages. Specific words help in searching for the right resolutions, and they need to respect that.

3
Routing and Switching / Re: Errors on T1 D-Channel
« on: September 19, 2022, 01:19:19 PM »
Is it possible you're headed for hardware failure? Are you able to run diagnostics on your unit?

4
Forum Lobby / Uber Got Hacked to the Bone
« on: September 16, 2022, 10:20:55 AM »
https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/security/uber-hacked-internal-systems-breached-and-vulnerability-reports-stolen/

The kid got access to EVERYTHING. Why? No MFA on the VPN, for starters. No MFA on accessing a network share with PowerShell scripts that had admin accounts embedded in them. No PAM on those admin/service accounts to keep them from being used to pwn every system in the house, including their HackerOne database. The attacker got a copy of every one of the reports, including the ones that are still broken, so expect more Uber woes.

Thank goodness the Uber app only has access to my personal information and credit card info. Oh, wait...

5
I used the same tools as before. Same connectors, as well.

6
Can I use Twitter to reach a hiring manager?

Question I wanted to get your perspective on trying to use Twitter to get attention from a hiring manager. I’m interested in a role that is a great fit and have tried networking but thus far I haven’t been able to get introduced to him by anyone at his company. I put together a slide deck discussing ideas for growth opportunities tor the company (It’s a strategy role). I am thinking of sharing the slides and introducing myself on Twitter. I’ve never done something this bold before but am really interested in the role. What are your thoughts? Should I


Join us for discussion! Can I use Twitter to reach a hiring manager?



Question


I wanted to get your perspective on trying to use Twitter to get attention from a hiring manager. I’m interested in a role that is a great fit and have tried networking but thus far I haven’t been able to get introduced to him by anyone at his company.


I put together a slide deck discussing ideas for growth opportunities tor the company (It’s a strategy role). I am thinking of sharing the slides and introducing myself on Twitter. I’ve never done something this bold before but am really interested in the role. What are your thoughts? Should I share the slides and indicate my interest in the role, then wait (hopefully) for him to ask me to send him my resume? Or should I share both the slides and my resume?


Nick’s Reply


twitter hiring managerThere has been a spate of articles online about how to use Twitter to get a job. It just seems so reductionist — cramming what you want to say into a tweet.


Worse, you’re exposing your entire pitch to the world. How does that get you an edge? It might get you more competition. Just because a hiring manager you want to work for is on Twitter doesn’t mean that’s the best way to address them. (You can “direct message” a manager only if they follow you, or if they accept DMs from anyone, which is unlikely.)


You could try it, but putting my little critique aside, the real problem is that Twitter is just another indirect communication layer you have virtually no control over. Why not go direct?


I’d find the manager’s e-mail and send him the deck you prepared. Better yet, track down someone the manager works with and trusts — and get introduced. This is a different kind of “communication layer” because there’s nothing like a personal referral, even if it’s someone you only just met. You said you’ve unsuccessfully tried networking your way in.  It’s not hard to engineer such meetings. Try a method I call “triangulate to get in the door.”


I admire your creativity. Just because I’m not a fan of addressing a hiring manager publicly on Twitter doesn’t mean you shouldn’t try it, but I’d do something more personal than hang yourself out on a social media platform.


The reader responds


Nick,


Thank you so much for your response, and your insightful advice. I actually did as you suggested and drafted a “pain letter,” showing what I understand about what the manager needs help with. I sent it along with the slides and my resume directly to the hiring manager. (I spent a couple of weeks on the deck to make sure it was relevant!)


He responded and I’m “in the door!” So this stuff actually works! Thanks!


Nick’s Reply


Yah, this stuff actually works. Managers are often startled by people who skip the job applications and instead jump right into “doing the job.” Glad you tried it! Even before a job interview, you’ve started demonstrating what you know about the job and how you’re going to do it. That gives you a substantial edge.


Please let me know how this turns out!


Have you ever used Twitter to get a job interview? What did you say in your tweet? How about other social media? Does this work any better the other way around — have you been recruited via Twitter?


: :


Join us for discussion! Can I use Twitter to reach a hiring manager?


Source: Can I use Twitter to reach a hiring manager?

7
Homework Help / Re: Why not authenticate the whole packet in ESP mode?
« on: September 04, 2022, 02:30:54 PM »
Found a good summary of the differences: https://www.ibm.com/docs/en/zos/2.3.0?topic=ipsec-ah-esp-protocols

AH auth would be redundant: Authentication Header auth. Rather, AH is auth, nothing more. ESP can provide richer functions, but you may want to use AH and ESP together to have the functions ESP brings enclosed in the full auth we get with AH.

8
Certifications and Careers / Re: Certification Goals 2022
« on: September 03, 2022, 03:57:10 PM »
Got them both. PSE Strata P has plenty of sales in it, fun times. PCNSA is way more technical - read the admin guide before testing, that's what saved me!

9
Forum Lobby / Re: Power automate, anyone??
« on: September 02, 2022, 05:10:41 PM »
OK, this is cool stuff. Should I hire a tech writer to implement it all for me? :D

10
Forum Lobby / Re: Power automate, anyone??
« on: September 01, 2022, 03:47:39 PM »
What's the 10,000 km view of power automate? This is new to me.

11
I'm doing my Palo certs and I can think of a GREAT solution for this involving an HA pair of PA-7000s in Virtual Wire mode. May be a bit pricey for a home solution, but you'll certainly have peace of mind that all is running as it should. :smug:

12
And that router needs to be set up so that the ONLY outbound routes for 1 and 2 are to the Cable ISP and the ONLY outbound routes for 3 and 4 are the DSL ISP. I'd add in also that all inbound traffic from the "wrong" connection should be dropped at the router, since you don't want it to come in.

Now, the design question... why do they get to talk to each other but have to use different ISPs? If it's a matter of load sharing, there are link balancer products that would permit that without having to introduce a routing scheme for your 4-PC setup.

If this is a home office or small office (SOHO is the acronym that describes this market), then it may be that you could get a managed switch that allows you to do VLANs and Layer 3 functions, that's what you would look for in that product. But it needs to be a managed SOHO device, because there will be configuration elements that you will have to specify for it to function as desired.

13
That is some good food for thought, especially about looking at their financial position. I've turned down people approaching me to work at places where I knew I wouldn't like the culture... and at places where they looked like a late-comer to a market without a compelling differentiator in their product other than, "we're cheaper and think we can run the table with the school and small-business market".

14
4 reasons to reject or accept a job offer

Question The last two times I accepted a job I soon regretted it. In both cases I was happy with the money, I liked the manager, and the job seemed a fit. But that’s clearly not enough. You must have some rules of thumb about the decision to reject or accept a job offer. What are they? Nick’s Reply It would help to know what happened at those two jobs that led to regret. If the reasons were the same, then you may have the problem right there. But even if that’s the case, I’m more concerned about your criteria


Join us for discussion! 4 reasons to reject or accept a job offer



Question


The last two times I accepted a job I soon regretted it. In both cases I was happy with the money, I liked the manager, and the job seemed a fit. But that’s clearly not enough. You must have some rules of thumb about the decision to reject or accept a job offer. What are they?


Nick’s Reply


accept a jobIt would help to know what happened at those two jobs that led to regret. If the reasons were the same, then you may have the problem right there. But even if that’s the case, I’m more concerned about your criteria for accepting a job. They’re not sufficient.


Insufficient reasons to accept a job


The compensation matters, of course. Anyone that suggests money is not a prime consideration is lying, is a fool, or is trying to distract you from a low offer. And just because you like someone doesn’t mean you will like working for them (or having them work for you, if you’re the manager).


Then we have your third criterion: “job fit.” This is perhaps the biggest misconception job seekers have. You might check off every box on the job description, but that doesn’t mean you’re a fit.


How can that be? Well, virtually everyone I’ve ever polled laughs when I ask them whether, six months into a new job, the work they’re doing is what they were told when they were hired. The work almost always changes and evolves, sometimes so extremely that the new hire is doing something entirely different from what they expected. (Of course, this could be a good thing or a bad thing!)


So, what can you hang your hat on when deciding whether a job is right for you?


Necessary reasons to accept a job


As you have undoubtedly experienced, most employers take their time filling a job. Most job seekers, on the other hand, are rushed. They don’t consider enough criteria when making a decision to accept a job.


I’ll grant you the three criteria you’ve mentioned are meaningful. But all three are characteristics of a job opportunity that you will instantly feel in your gut. It takes no real effort to consider them.



  • I feel okay about the salary,

  • The manager and I hit it off,

  • The work described is right for me,


That may all be necessary to justify accepting a job, but it’s not sufficient. I think there’s more, but it requires some effort and patience.


4 criteria to accept a job offer


There are four other criteria you should apply to every job opportunity you encounter: the company’s (1) people, (2) products and technology, (3) finances, and (4) prospects. I believe if any one of these criteria is not met, you should walk away from the deal.


1. The people


The boss is just one part of the team, or the company, you’re joining. It’s likely that several other employees and managers will have a greater impact on your success (and satisfaction) at the job.


If the job is in Engineering, for example, it matters who is running Manufacturing and who is running Sales. If these latter managers are not competent, what the Engineering team designs may not be fully realized as viable products, and Sales may not be able to sell them. So you need to assess people at the company beyond just your boss before you decide to yoke your career to theirs.


Before making your decision to join up, ask to meet two or three managers whose departments are relevant to your own success. Also ask to meet two or three members of the team you’d be working on.


Accept the job only if the people in the company are competent, if not exceptional. It’s up to you to figure this out.


2. The products (and perhaps the technology)


Sure, you could do the job, but will you be working on products (or services) that are among the best in the business? Are the products competitive in the company’s market? Or is the company’s product line middling, if not low quality? Do customers rave positively about these products, or do they complain?


Does the company’s technology stack up well, or is it outdated? Will you be using tools at your job that enable you to work efficiently and to do your very best work? Or will you need to use bubblegum and baling wire to keep the machine working?


If the product line is not a shining light in the industry, and the company’s technology is obsolete, the company’s prospects probably aren’t good. Your prospects won’t be good, either.


Examine how the company’s products, services and technology compare to the competition’s. Unless you’re taking the job just for a paycheck, think twice before mounting a lame horse.


3. The company’s finances


I’d never take a job without meeting a finance manager or two at a company, or at least talking with someone that understands the company’s financial condition. This might seem irrelevant if you’re a machinist, or a programmer, or a production-line worker. But if the company has financial troubles, it may not be able to meet payroll. It may need to lay off workers before long. It may be unable to improve its technology, or afford to hire great sales people, and to compete effectively in its market.


If you’re considering a management job at a smaller company, ask for a brief meeting with the CFO. Ask about cash flow, debt and sources of funding for future growth. Even if you don’t know what these things are, the reaction you get will be telling.


At the very least, do an online search about the company’s sales and profits (if it’s publicly held). A simple search for any news articles could provide valuable insights.


4. The company’s pipeline and prospects


Invest the time to learn what new products, technologies, and business deals the company has in the pipeline. Does it have an edge over its competitors? Is it attracting new customers?


This is actually an amalgamation of the previous three criteria because we’re interested in the company’s plans for the future: What kinds of employees and managers is the company trying to attract, what new products and customers are in its pipeline, and how will it ensure its financial viability? What does the near- and long-term future look like?


If you want your future at a company to be good, you need to know how good the company’s prospects are.


Is this overkill?


In today’s fast-moving economy, when workers are more likely to jump jobs more often and employers are more likely to hire and lay off quickly, these suggestions might seem like overkill. Why do all that homework, ask for extra meetings and spend time thinking about all these factors — when you don’t plan to stick around a company very long anyway?


My answer is simple: You might get some big bumps in pay by changing jobs frequently among questionable companies. But there’s a lot to be said for working with high quality people that are producing exciting, desirable products that generate healthy profits — because that’s the path to a satisfying future for you and your employer.


A good salary, a boss you like, and work that matches your skills may be necessary for a job to work out well for you, but they’re not sufficient. Without meeting the four criteria I’ve described, I think you’re likely to be seeking another job again soon.


Accept the right job offer


What I’m really saying is, you should put a lot more into judging the place where you’re considering investing most of your waking hours. I find that the #1 reason people go job hunting is because they took the wrong job to begin with. Too often, they jump at what comes along — especially money! — rather than carefully choose the jobs and companies they pursue. The people, the products, the financial condition and the future prospects of a company will have a lot to do with your personal success.


I have no quarrel with you if you just need a job as quickly as possible so you can put food on the table and pay the rent. Take any job you must. But if you want a job with a future where you will be happy, successful and well-paid, it’s worth taking the trouble to figure all this out before you accept a job offer — so that you don’t have to go job hunting again any time soon.


What criteria do you consider important when deciding to reject or accept a job offer? Which of the four we discussed is most important to you? What criteria would you add?


: :


Join us for discussion! 4 reasons to reject or accept a job offer


Source: 4 reasons to reject or accept a job offer

15
1B hex is 27 dec so that makes as no sense.

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