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I read that and thought, no real need to grab the link for it. The counter-offer is way too late. Especially if it's just a match offer.
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The Counter-Offer: Why do they wait until you quit?

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Question After I gave my two weeks’ notice and told my manager I’m leaving for a new job, my current company worked hard to try to get me to stay. My manager’s boss wants to make a counter-offer, but I said no, thanks, I won’t accept it. They both said the door is always open for me to come back.

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Forum Lobby / Re: Hotel/Airline Benefit Extensions
« Last post by deanwebb on September 20, 2021, 09:30:49 AM »
Yeah, there are some pretty strict quarantines going on in Australia, got all the footy finals in a twist. But that means if they want to have you stay in their loyalty programs, they have to be the most flexible they've ever been.

Back in December, it seemed like we'd be on full travel by June. Nope.
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Forum Lobby / Re: Hotel/Airline Benefit Extensions
« Last post by Dieselboy on September 19, 2021, 09:40:08 PM »
thats good. I have 250,000 qantas airline points and when I checked before I need just 100,000 for a return trip from Perth AU to London UK. The plan was to do this, or get premium economy upgrade for the non-stop 17-hour flight and visit my family more often.

I had the "status" extended for 12 months last year and this year they offered to do the same BUT I had to have a flight booked. Since Australia wont let me leave the country, I had to book a flight somewhere else in Australia. Since Perth is in the middle of knowhere in relation to other places of interest (foreign countries are closer and cheaper to get to from here!) I had to book a flight to over the East side of Australia which was around $700. I used around 60,000 points to bring the price down. Qantas said to me, I only need a flight booked to qualify for the extension (this has worked). I can now change the flight. Because of corona they are being extra flexible with changes/cancellations. I will definitely need to catch a flight in the future, I just do not know when. 
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Forum Lobby / Re: I Hope I'm Not Mentioned in This Article...
« Last post by deanwebb on September 17, 2021, 12:45:18 PM »
The moment I found out my boss was an algorithm I would have been working on an exit plan.

Indeed. I do NOT want to see anyone going down that road. Ever. I think that's the darker side of the gig economy.
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Forum Lobby / Re: I Hope I'm Not Mentioned in This Article...
« Last post by config t on September 17, 2021, 09:34:32 AM »
The moment I found out my boss was an algorithm I would have been working on an exit plan.
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How to Say It: I want interview feedback!

Question I enjoyed reading your book and I enjoy getting your newsletter even though I feel a little out of place because I am in Human Resources. I find your observations about the hiring process to be very accurate. You have a knack for explaining how to phrase certain questions and statements in interviews so that they will come off sounding right. I need your help asking for interview feedback. When I’ve just been interviewed for a job, I want feedback. Please tell me how to say it to the hiring manager: “How did I do during the interview? What


Join us for discussion! How to Say It: I want interview feedback!



Question


I enjoyed reading your book and I enjoy getting your newsletter even though I feel a little out of place because I am in Human Resources. I find your observations about the hiring process to be very accurate. You have a knack for explaining how to phrase certain questions and statements in interviews so that they will come off sounding right. I need your help asking for interview feedback.


When I’ve just been interviewed for a job, I want feedback. Please tell me how to say it to the hiring manager: “How did I do during the interview? What are my prospects for moving forward?”


Nick’s Reply


interview feedbackThanks for your kind words. Don’t feel out of place. Many HR folks subscribe to this newsletter, and you’d be surprised how often I’m hired by HR organizations to speak at their meetings. There are many progressive HR practitioners out there!


I’m going to try to answer your question with a suggestion that not only gets you the feedback you need, but which can also make you a much stronger candidate.


Candid interview feedback


Getting interview feedback is indeed a bit of an art. But if you stand back from the experience, like a headhunter does, you kinda wonder, Why don’t all managers provide feedback immediately and to all job candidates? Why does anyone have to ask?


I think it’s mainly because interviewers don’t know how to phrase their comments and because they don’t want to appear like they’re making a commitment. They need help with “how to say it” themselves!


Candor is important in business transactions. I think a manager should have a pretty good idea whether a candidate is a likely fit — and should know why — by the end of just one interview. While it may help to interview other candidates before making a decision, it’s healthy for a manager to test their judgment immediately: If this candidate were the only candidate available, would I hire them? Why or why not?


That is the substance of candid, end-of-interview feedback to any candidate.


A manager should share their reaction to your interview right there, on the spot. Here’s how I think you can nudge the information out of them. It involves putting them off balance a bit with a what-if question.


How to Say It


“Thanks for taking time to meet with me. I’ve learned a lot about your operation and I hope you’ve gotten a clear idea of who I am and what I can do for you. Before we part company I’d like to ask you something. What if, instead of a job interview, this had been a project meeting and I was your employee? Would you promote me? Would you give me a raise? Or would you fire me? Based on our meeting, please tell me which you would do. No holds barred — be completely honest with me. Because if I haven’t shown you how I could help your bottom line, then you shouldn’t hire me.”


You should, of course, bend and shape that to suit your own style and needs. Let it sound like you, not me.


Interview feedback: Hire me or fire me?


Please consider this statement carefully: If I haven’t shown you how I’d contribute to your bottom line, then you shouldn’t hire me.



                           

                            How can you pull off the kind of job interview that makes you confident about using the How to Say It suggestion in this column? Stand Out: How to be the profitable hire.
                           

                       
That’s a strong position to take. It’s almost a challenge to the hiring manager! And it should be. After all, the entire interview was the manager’s challenge to you! Candidates who are unable or unwilling to make such a statement simply have no business in that job interview. Did you prepare enough? Were you convincing enough? If not, you don’t deserve to be hired. In my experience, engaging a manager on this make-or-break level can elicit the candid, important interview feedback you need.


I believe this is also an excellent way to prepare for your interview. If you want to increase your chances of positive feedback, be the candidate that truly deserves it.


Whether or not the manager actually answers you, I think their demeanor will reveal a lot and you’ll know whether to go home and wait for an offer, or move on to another job opportunity where you can be a more compelling candidate.


How do you say it? Prying useful interview feedback from employers is difficult and awkward. Do you have magic words that work? How confident are you about the feedback you’ll get? What other tough questions would you like “How to Say It” advice about?


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Source: How to Say It: I want interview feedback!
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Blogs of Interest and Note / ASK THE HEADHUNTER How to invest in job futures
« Last post by deanwebb on September 17, 2021, 06:03:23 AM »
How to invest in job futures

Question I sought out a couple of companies that I want to work with, researched them, found actual names to contact personally, and got interviews. They are impressed with my background and they want the talent I offer in their organization, but do not have a position open right at the moment. What can I say, or how can I continue to approach them so they do not forget about me? Nick’s Reply I’m going to show you how to stop trying to get a job today, and how to invest in job futures. You have accomplished what all job


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Question


I sought out a couple of companies that I want to work with, researched them, found actual names to contact personally, and got interviews. They are impressed with my background and they want the talent I offer in their organization, but do not have a position open right at the moment. What can I say, or how can I continue to approach them so they do not forget about me?


Nick’s Reply


job futuresI’m going to show you how to stop trying to get a job today, and how to invest in job futures.


You have accomplished what all job hunters set out to do: You got a company interested in you. Even though neither of these two can hire you now, they are very real, long-term prospects and you’d be remiss if you did not cultivate them properly.


But here’s the important lesson: This is how most good opportunities germinate.


Job futures


It’s far more likely for an employer to meet impressive candidates than it is to hire one. Even after the interview, you remain impressive. It’s just that, no matter how impressed it was, the employer forgets you. It’s on you to keep that spark of interest alive by investing in it. Most people just flat-out fail to recognize and nurture “job futures.” Future opportunities are some of the very best if you keep tending them. Don’t let this one die on the vine.


Good opportunities germinate in a first encounter, and bear fruit later.


Imagine if during your life you had five or ten companies express this level of interest in you. At some point in the future, one or more of these seeds could blossom into a serious opportunity, but only if you tend it during all that time. The next step you take is potentially far more important than responding to job postings or tweaking your LinkedIn profile. So get moving.


They won’t forget you


I would e-mail or call the managers you spoke with. Give a gracious thank-you, and ask if there are other positions open — positions for which you might be able to recommend other candidates. Yes, you are offering a professional courtesy. You are helping these managers fill other jobs and you’re establishing a valuable relationship, and you’re helping a friend get a job. (Don’t worry that you’re creating your own competition by referring someone else! If these managers think you’d fit one of those other jobs, they now have even more reason to consider you — they already know you!)


They won’t forget you.


Then ask for a favor in return: Do they know managers in other good companies — managers they respect — to whom they would recommend you? Add, “And if nothing works out, I promise to stay in touch with you in the event a position opens up in your company.” Ping them every three months. Share a relevant article you’ve read, ask for advice about some work-related topic, and otherwise gently cultivate your connection.


Keep tending this investment and they won’t forget you. This is how I cultivate good candidates I’ve found but have not placed. Yet.


Invest now


I’ve seen people miss out on great opportunities because they failed to understand how long-term business relationships work, and because they are in a rush. They want a job now, so they disregard a chance to develop a lasting relationship they will need in the future. Today’s job often arises from diligent follow-up work you started years ago.


In three years, you’ll wish you’d started doing this now.


Has a rejection ever turned into a job offer for you later on? Do you stay in touch with managers you “clicked” with but who didn’t hire you? Do you have other examples of such contrarian experiences, where a thoughtful courtesy — I call it investing in job futures — results in a benefit later on?


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Source: How to invest in job futures
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Job-search blasphemy: Ask for the boss’s resume

Question 60 years of experience have taught me that most managers are not qualified to manage. But most job applicants never check them out before accepting a job. Nor do they check out the managers several layers up. It’s a recipe for disaster and it’s so obvious. What are your thoughts? Nick’s Reply Ever ask a hiring manager for their resume before you agree to a job interview? No? Why not? This is the danger of applying for lots and lots of jobs. The more jobs a person applies for, the less due diligence they do on any of them,


Join us for discussion! Job-search blasphemy: Ask for the boss’s resume



Question


60 years of experience have taught me that most managers are not qualified to manage. But most job applicants never check them out before accepting a job. Nor do they check out the managers several layers up. It’s a recipe for disaster and it’s so obvious. What are your thoughts?


Nick’s Reply


boss's resumeEver ask a hiring manager for their resume before you agree to a job interview? No? Why not?


This is the danger of applying for lots and lots of jobs. The more jobs a person applies for, the less due diligence they do on any of them, including on the managers they’d go to work for. When one of 20 job applications yields an interview, there’s no good way to do your homework in time. In fact, the smartest approach is to do your homework before you apply! (Don’t miss What if there’s no time to prepare for the interview?)


Who’s your boss?


I believe the failure to do such due diligence increases the chances you’ll go to work for a lousy manager, simply because the baseline probability that any particular manager is inept is significant.


“Nor do they check out the managers several layers up.”



                           

                            Resume Challenge: Who’s the boss?

I invite managers, HR, career experts, even job seekers to give us one good reason why hiring managers should not provide their resumes to job applicants. Use the Comments section below.
                           

                       
Now you’re literally “taking this to the next level!” I mean as a job seeking strategy. Job seekers typically “research a company” before an interview, but their research is cursory at best. Here’s the key: “It’s the people, Stupid!” You need to know who’s your boss. (The other key is Never work with jerks.)


A prudent job seeker checks out the hiring manager who owns the job, and the bosses above the manager. Your success at a job depends heavily on the people that run the joint. While the conventional wisdom focuses on winning an offer, that’s not the goal. The goal is a job working for good managers and a good company.


So I agree with you completely. Check out the management stack before you invest time pursuing a job. Because if you don’t, and you invest heavily in interviews, and they make you an offer, you’re very likely to take an offer from the wrong people — and you will rationalize your decision simply because you put so much time into it.


Due diligence


Pick your target companies and managers thoughtfully. This is the time for due diligence.


Before you interview:



  • Ask who will interview you.

  • Ask who the hiring manager is.

  • Ask who is the manager’s boss and who their boss is.

  • Use Google and LinkedIn to check them out further. Be thorough.

  • Ask around — who knows these managers?


After you interview with the hiring manager, ask to briefly meet their bosses.



                           

                            In Fearless Job Hunting, Book 5: Get The Right Employer’s Attention, I show how to conduct due diligence before and during the interview, and before accepting a job offer. These are just a few tips to help keep you out of trouble.


In the interview, don’t miss these points:



  • What must the company do to meet its goals? Is your job important in meeting these objectives? How?

  • Check out the tools that will be at your disposal. If they’re not part of the deal today, don’t expect you’ll get what you need later.

  • Who, in other departments, will affect your ability to do your job successfully? Meet them. Look for facilitators and debilitators—people that will help and hinder your performance.


From “Is this a Mickey Mouse operation?”, pp. 13-15



                           

                       

Have you seen your boss’s resume?


The alternative is to request what they demand from you — the bosses’ resumes. Does this all seem inappropriate and awkward? Perhaps even blasphemous? Contrary to how we’re programmed to (not) think when we’re job hunting, seeing your new bosses’ resumes would be a prudent, reasonable thing before you decide to throw in with them.


They want to know who you are before they’ll interview you. They want your resume. They want to talk to your former bosses (references). And you can bet they’re going to check you out online.


Maybe you won’t see their resumes, but by job offer time, make sure you know who your bosses are. Judge them all, because your success depends largely on who you’re working with.


Do you know who your bosses will be when you’re considering a job offer? Is it so unreasonable to want to read a new boss’s resume? How do you avoid taking a job with the wrong people? How else can you check out, in advance, who you’ll be working with?


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Blogs of Interest and Note / ASK THE HEADHUNTER Jobs for old managers?
« Last post by deanwebb on September 17, 2021, 06:03:23 AM »
Jobs for old managers?

Nick’s take Peter Cappelli’s survey reveals that outsiders can be the best managers at a company. More important: An uptick in contract management jobs may be a boon for retired (older!) managers who still want to work. Cappelli also points out the gotchas in such jobs. But if I were a retired manager or an unemployed manager of any age, I’d be looking at consulting firms that fill such jobs. Cappelli names one in the article. What’s your take? First, can an “outsider” manager really pull off what insiders can’t? To my point, could this be a good career channel


Join us for discussion! Jobs for old managers?




                           

                           

How Contractors Can Successfully Manage from the Outside


Source: Knowledge@Wharton

By Staff




old managersWharton management professor Peter Cappelli ran into a former student who noticed an increasing number of managers being hired on contract. These weren’t consultants or people angling for full-time work, but contractors who were being handed over control of company employees to execute a project or tackle a problem.


Despite being outsiders with no personal connections or networks, these contractor-managers were doing a terrific job. “They don’t have anything to gain by taking credit from you,” Cappelli said. “You can trust them much more than you can trust your own boss by revealing problems. They’re not going to punish you for that, but do you trust your own manager not to do that?”


If contractor-managers don’t want any credit, and they aren’t interested in getting their foot in the door at a company, what’s really in it for them? Cappelli explained that most of them are retired or in the late stage of their careers, they have amassed a certain amount of knowledge, and they want the flexibility that comes with being an independent contractor.


“It’s an interesting self-selection,” he said. “They are people who aren’t necessarily young and hungry, not desperate for work. What they appreciate is the ability to have some choice over what they do and how they do it.”





 



Continue reading



                           

                       


Nick’s take


Peter Cappelli’s survey reveals that outsiders can be the best managers at a company. More important: An uptick in contract management jobs may be a boon for retired (older!) managers who still want to work. Cappelli also points out the gotchas in such jobs. But if I were a retired manager or an unemployed manager of any age, I’d be looking at consulting firms that fill such jobs. Cappelli names one in the article.


What’s your take? First, can an “outsider” manager really pull off what insiders can’t? To my point, could this be a good career channel for unemployed managers — especially retired ones?



 


 


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